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Chester A. Arthur

Very soon after Garfield’s funeral, and during Arthur’s term, there was a grand procession at Yorktown, to celebrate “Surrender Day,” or the centennial of Cornwallis’s surrender, October 19, 1781, in the Revolutionary War. Visitors came thither from all parts of the country, and descendants of the three illustrious Frenchmen, De Grasse, De Rochambeau, and De… Read More

Abraham Lincoln

Lincoln never pretended to be either wise or clever, but his life motto was “to do his level best,” and he manfully put it into practice. He did not like to hear all the quarreling that was going on, and always did all he could to stop it. But when he thought a thing right… Read More

Tippecanoe

It was during President Madison’s first term that war broke out. Ever since the beginning of the Revolutionary War, the British had secretly excited the Indians against the Americans. This was easy to do, because the Indians were already angry at the rapid advance of the settlers. In 1800, so many Americans had gone to… Read More

Thomas Jefferson

The third President of our country was Thomas Jefferson, author of the Declaration of Independence, and of the Act of Religious Freedom in Virginia. A good and honest man, the “Sage of Monticello” always kept the resolution made at the age of twenty-six, when elected a burgess: “Never to engage while in public office in… Read More

The Mexican War

Texas had grown very tired of Mexico’s harsh rule. So Stephen Austin and Samuel Houston, two Americans who had received large grants of land in Texas, encouraged the people to revolt and form a republic of their own. They did so, and when the Mexicans tried to force them to obey, they won their freedom… Read More

Santiago Bay

From the very first, it was plain to all that our eastern coast was in the most danger, for besides her fleet in the Philippines and gunboats along the Cuban and Puerto Rican coasts, Spain had many war ships near home. Fearing lest some of these vessels should attack our towns, and knowing we had… Read More

Grant Takes Control

The next move made by Union forces was Sherman’s raid across Mississippi, from Vicksburg, early in 1864. His aim was to destroy bridges and railroads over which supplies could be sent to the Confederate army, and to burn mills and factories. He did this so thoroughly, and left so little standing at Meridian, that one… Read More

Grover Cleveland (1st term)

In 1885, Grover Cleveland became the twenty–second President of the United States. He was the first Democratic President seen in the White House for twenty–four years. Even some Republicans voted for him in preference to Blaine, their own candidate, because they knew he would uphold the civil–service reform. Cleveland, the son of a minister, was… Read More

James Monroe

Madison was succeeded, in 1817, by President James Monroe, who took his oath on the ruins of the Capitol. As he gazed at the foundations, which were quite unharmed, he said that they reminded him of the Union, which was as firm as ever, in spite of all that had happened. The war being over… Read More

Sioux Indians On War Path

While the War of the Secession was raging on in the southern part of the country, the Sioux Indians in the West, who had always been troublesome, suddenly dug up the war hatchet, and invaded Minnesota and Iowa. Here they attacked lonely farmhouses and small villages, killing and scalping nearly a thousand men, women, and… Read More