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Franklin Pierce

Fillmore, in the meantime, had been succeeded by Franklin Pierce, fourteenth President of the United States. Pierce had been a poor lad, but he managed to secure a good education. He then became a lawyer, and was so determined to succeed that when some people made fun of him, after a first failure, he firmly… Read More

Telegraph

Among other interesting inventions of this time was the making of the first photographs, or daguerreotypes. Then there was also the discovery that a patient could be put to sleep, so that he need not feel pain, while doctors performed an operation. But the greatest change in our country, and, indeed, in the whole world… Read More

French Revolt Leads to War

In 1789, the French, who had long been dissatisfied with their government, rose up against the good but somewhat stupid Louis XVI. After some changes, they decided to set up a republic, like the Americans. To get rid of their king they finally beheaded him (1793), more in punishment for the sins of his fathers… Read More

Tripolitan Pirates Break Treaty

During the next seven years, after the Tripolitan treaty, American shipping was left alone; but after the War of 1812, the Barbary pirates, thinking the British had destroyed our navy, again began to attack our ships. They also ordered the American consul to leave Algiers, and he saved himself and family from slavery only by… Read More

British Sign New Orleans Treaty

The British soldiers marched steadily on, encouraged by the loud music of a little drummer boy perched up in a tree, but they were driven back again and again. The hot fire of the Americans slew Pakenham and many officers, and killed or wounded about a fifth of the British army, while the American loss… Read More

The South’s Victories

Although quite unprepared for war, the North was in many respects better off than the South. Not only did it have many more inhabitants, but it owned shipyards, machine shops, and manufactories of all kinds, and could thus supply all its army's needs. This was not the case in the South, where, until then, the… Read More

James A. Garfield

In 1880 there was a new and very exciting election. The different parties were all eager, as usual, to have their candidates elected; but the Republicans had had much trouble in choosing theirs. While some wanted Grant for a third time, others cried, “Anything to beat Grant,” because they thought it wrong to let a… Read More

Lincoln Wants to Limit Slavery

Lincoln was tall and ungainly, but his homely face was so strong and kind that every one trusted him. He was for several years a member of the Illinois legislature, and was once a member of Congress. Later on, when it came time to elect a senator for his state, some of his friends named… Read More

Creek Indian Attacks

Before dying in Canada, however, Tecumseh had gone south to stir up the Creek Indians in Alabama. As they did not seem inclined to rebel, they made Tecumseh very angry. He finally cried: “Your blood is white. You have taken my red sticks and my talk, but you do not mean to fight. I know… Read More

The Taking of Vicksburg

As already stated, Vicksburg stands on a steep bluff; it is more than two hundred feet above the river. It was, besides, well fortified on all sides, and very ably defended by the Confederate General Pemberton. Grant soon saw that it would be best to attack Vicksburg from the land side; but to do that… Read More